Resource Management

2015 Corporate Responsibility report > Environmental Resilience

Resource Management

Nesher’s environmental policy is based on the principles of the industrial ecology approach.

Industrial ecology deals with shifting away from linear industrial processes, whereby resources and capital pass through the production chain and turn into waste, to a closed-circuit system in which waste can serve as input for new production processes. Research focuses on a range of issues that include the flow of materials and energy (industrial metabolism), technological changes in relation to the environment, life cycle, planning and design, eco-efficiency, product-driven environmental policies and more.
As part of the adoption of this approach, Nesher utilizes by-products from other industries as substitutes for both fuel and raw materials, returning what used to be process waste into the production process. Nesher uses marginal water as a substitute for freshwater wherever possible, and also uses wastewater for cooling, wetting roads, and preventing dust.

Life Cycle Assessment
The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a tool for assessing environmental impacts of products and materials during all stages of the product's life cycle, from raw material excavation and production to product use and finally to its end-of-life.Life Cycle Assessment helps to identify solutions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, find alternatives to harmful materials, and compare between environmental impacts of different products.
Nesher used this method to test some of its products using the most advanced software, and in 2014 the Company began publishing Environmental Product Declarations for its products.

EPD – Environmental
Product Declarations

epsd

The EPD provides information on the environmental impact of a product's production process, from the raw material supply stage to delivery of the product to the customer. The aim is to provide consumers with total transparency with regard to all environmental information pertaining to the products to allow them to include all environmental considerations in their product choices.

In 2014 Nesher issued Environmental Product Declarations (EPD) in the International EPD registry for Nesher products (the three main cement types.)

epsd1
Portland cement
CEM II 42.5 NB-LL

epsd2
Portland Cement
CEM I 52.5 N
epsd3
Portland Cement
CEM II 42.5 N/AM-SLV

The construction industry has readily embraced the environmental reporting approach for its products, especially with regard to green construction.This approach is being advocated by international bodies, such as the UK Green Building Council – which is promoting the standards of the BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method), and the US Green Building Council (USGBC), which supervises the LEED green building standard.
Nesher is the first company in Israel to issue Environmental Product Declarations. The company decided to do so in order to promote green building in Israel, since cement, used properly, is an excellent basis for green construction.

Sustainable material management –
Raw materials

12.4%

Utilization of alternative raw materials

Nesher mines its main raw material from quarries near its plants. Reduction of the quarries' environmental impacts and their rehabilitation are part of the main challenges the global cement industry is grappling with; these require a broad perspective and long-term vision. To this end, there is a constant search for alternative materials that reduce the demand for quarried (virgin) raw materials. The alternative raw materials are mostly byproducts from other industries, such as fly ash from the Israel Electric Corporation’s power station used in the production of clinker and as a clinker substitute; industrially produced gypsum as an substitute for natural gypsum; and soils polluted with fuels as a substitute for the clays. The Company takes in limestone, which is a byproduct of the water softening process at the Israel Electric Corporation’s Gezer power plant. Process waste from the past is also used today as raw materials substitute. The integration of the alternative materials in the production process does not impact the quality of the end-product produced and marketed by Nesher.

Nesher currently uses 12.4% alternative raw materials and continues to seek sources for alternative raw materials.

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Raw materials consumption

  • 2005
    4952344
    847315
    653057
    85300
    18738
  • 2006
    5455000
    849000
    641290
    146952
    20370
  • 2007
    5791575
    742259
    829387
    46856
    19206
  • 2008
    5453443
    740315
    862363
    37434
    44729
  • 2009
    4694947
    758392
    845412
    29240
    29732
  • 2010
    5199790
    772953
    825274
    105425
    34826
  • 2011
    5345181
    747198
    952061
    102836
    27802
  • 2012
    5095342
    751759
    885971
    83467
    32797
  • 2013
    4840977
    651045
    962792
    89034
    40393
  • 2014
    5277425
    959395
    944730
    101540
    68075
  • 2015
    5306417
    1031396
    850530
    107080
    47236
    • 0M
    • 2M
    • 4M
    • 6M
    • 8M
    • 10M
  • Limestone
  • Clay
  • Alternative raw materials
  • Gypsum
  • Sand
Reusing process waste
as raw materials

In the past, Nesher disposed of very large amounts of kiln dust, which was the source of most of the solid waste. From the beginning of the 21st century, kiln dust can be returned to the production process as raw material for the kilns, and also as a substitute for clinker. In 2015, about 107K tons of kiln dust were returned to the cement production process.

Recycled raw Materials

  • 2005
    467409
    110112
    0
    69471
    0
    6065
  • 2006
    502425
    58800
    20
    67200
    0
    12845
  • 2007
    567672
    132993
    39831
    79504
    0
    9387
  • 2008
    615416
    131188
    31517
    75378
    0
    8864
  • 2009
    600119
    132703
    39818
    66887
    0
    5885
  • 2010
    600913
    105155
    46335
    67824
    0
    5047
  • 2011
    676688
    123308
    61773
    73098
    12000
    5194
  • 2012
    570743
    150541
    59301
    90951
    12000
    2435
  • 2013
    582072
    121887
    64778
    73983
    116695
    3377
  • 2014
    457776
    113303
    79382
    69900
    221419
    2950
  • 2015
    429458
    138398
    98886
    68791
    106984
    8013
    • 0k
    • 200k
    • 400k
    • 600k
    • 800k
    • 1000k
  • Flyash
  • Gypsum from industry
  • Industrial by-products
  • Millscale
  • Limestone substitutes
  • Clay substitutes

Reducing environmental impacts in Nesher quarries

Nesher is working to optimize management of potential environmental impacts caused by quarry activities, such as noise and dust reduction, minimizing impact on animals, and removal and replanting of geophytes before carrying out quarrying activities. Nesher makes an effort to reduce the quarries' environmental impact through appropriate planning in the design stage. Like other quarry owners in Israel, Nesher pays a certain percentage from every quarried ton to a quarries rehabilitation fund.

 Nesher Ramla plantKedmaTamaraNesher Clay Ramla Agamim
Quarry area (km2)
1.0992.5780.7250.1410.255
Underground area
N/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Location in relation to protected area
A protected area exists within the quarry area-
Type of activity
QuarryingQuarryingQuarryingQuarryingQuarrying
Ecosystem
TerrestrialTerrestrialTerrestrialTerrestrialTerrestrial

 Nesher Ramla plantKedmaTamaraNesher Clay RamlaAgamim
Size of protected or restored
6.2
area(In Hectares)
Total infringed area not yet restored
105.6159.314.48.62.0
Area infringed during 2015
1.5310.00080.

More about Nesher quarries

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Verical quarrying with no explosions

The Ramla quarry was planned in advance to mitigate environmental impacts. Quarrying in Ramla is focused on vertical digging deep into the ground without explosions. Artificial earth mounds were built around the quarry to a height of more than 10 meters. On those mounds, trees fitting the natural flora and landscape were planted. These activities minimize the environmental impacts, such as dust, noise and damage to the landscape.

Limestone conveyor

In an effort to further reduce its environmental impact, an enclosed conveyor belt was built at the Ramla plant, connecting the quarry with the plant and replacing dozens of trucks that may have caused high volumes of traffic and air pollution. The conveyor belt is lifted above ground level on pillars allowing free passage of agricultural vehicles and wild animals from one side to the other, thus minimizing ecosystem fragmentation. The conveyor belt significantly reduces the energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission per limestone ton per kilometer compared to truck transportation. The conveyor belt roofing reduces dust release and protects the raw material from moisture, slightly reducing consumption of energy which would otherwise be needed to dry the material during the clinker production process. Nesher also operates a historic conventional mountainside quarry in Haifa.

Preservation in quarries: archeological findings

Israel is located in an area with an important history. Nesher, in collaboration with the Antiquities Authority, invests highly in digging for and conservation of the archeological findings in its quarries. Antiquities dating to ancient times were discovered at Nesher’s Ramla quarry (Ancient Rome and the Byzantine age). For more information, please see Nesher’s environmental reports for 2004 and 2006. A few exhibits can be seen at the Company’s visitor center near the Ramla plant.

Nature and landscape surveys; Preservation of species diversity

As part of the continued quarrying activities in Ramla quarry, and in compliance with the requirements of the Ministry for Environmental Protection, a survey of nature and landscape was conducted at the Ramla quarry. A botanical survey was conducted in the area designated for the expansion of the quarry in an attempt to identify geophytes (onion and tuber plants), considered by law as protected flora. A geophytes survey conducted in February 2007 found significant concentrations of cyclamens and anemones. Nesher adopted the recommendations of the survey and took action accordingly. Geophytes were removed from an area of 80,000 km2 designated for quarrying and replanted by an external contractor monitored by the Israel Nature and Parks Authority. Nesher continuously takes precautions to prevent damage to the flora in the active quarry area. In 2013-2014, 400 protected trees will be moved from the quarry area and replanted in alternative areas.

Intelligent Use of Energy

8%

alternative fuels in 2015

The cement production process is energy intensive, and reducing energy consumption and improving its efficiency is therefore one of the most significant challenges facing the cement industry. Nesher invests in searching for alternative energy resources in order to ensure the company’s future success. For example, the Company uses Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) - processed fuel generated from industrial and urban waste with a high energetic value.The Company also utilizes used solvents as a substitute for fuels and thus eliminates the need to destroy these solvents and reduces the Company's fossil fuel consumption.

Increased use of alternative fuels as alternative energy sources: Currently, the use of alternative fuels amounts to 8%. Aiming to increase the percentage of this component in its fuel mix, Nesher has set itself the goal of 20% in 2016.

Nesher constantly takes steps to improve its manufacturing technologies. In 2006, Nesher began operating one of the most advanced, efficient cement mills in the world, which achieves some 20% savings in electricity consumption. Additionally, as of 2010, the Ramla plant consumes electricity from a power station fueled by natural gas.

circular economy
Circular economy refers to the transition from linear production and consumption systems to closed, circular industrial systems. Linear production systems that we are all familiar with are industrial systems in which raw materials are processed and used in product manufacturing processes, then serve as products, and are eventually discarded as waste, which is either buried in landfills or emitted into the environment in an unregulated manner.

Circular economy presents a new approach in which "waste" is not regarded as a problem, but rather as by-products that may be used as a resource in production processes. With proper planning and suitable industrial processing, all waste can be used in the production of new similar or other products, as spare parts, or in other production processes, thus achieving maximum efficiency. Companies that adopt this approach very soon discover that it is worth their while to create superior products that, if designed properly in advance, can be dismantled and recycled. Some even use the Collaborative Economy model, whereby instead of selling products, such as cars, to customers, they retain ownership of the cars and offer rental services. In this way companies retain access to the raw materials and products. Customers are afforded mobility on demand without the expense of purchasing a vehicle, while manufacturers retain ownership of the raw materials that go into producing a car – metals, plastic, electric components, and many other components that could be used in the future.

Fuel consumption

GJ
  • 2005
    11633297
    147339
    133945
    123252
    0
  • 2006
    11968400
    115261
    147791
    121550
    0
  • 2007
    11650741
    204141
    136224
    126058
    0
  • 2008
    11557647
    121402
    114238
    131495
    0
  • 2009
    10534574
    121402
    102942
    91490
    0
  • 2010
    11927317
    78740
    83248
    83062
    2470
  • 2011
    11851000
    130000
    106000
    134000
    1796
  • 2012
    11858000
    136000
    113000
    215000
    2070
  • 2013
    11074000
    368000
    112000
    193000
    2020
  • 2014
    12098000
    88000
    108000
    557000
    2290
  • 2015
    11566961
    101461
    116887
    1002000
    2240
    • 0M
    • 2.5M
    • 5M
    • 7.5M
    • 10M
    • 12.5M
  • Petcock
  • Heavy fuel oil
  • Diesel oil
  • Alternative fuels
  • gasoline

Fuel consumption per ton of product

NIS Million
  • 2005
    2.68
  • 2006
    2.88
  • 2007
    2.91
  • 2008
    2.81
  • 2009
    2.28
  • 2010
    2.47
  • 2011
    2.54
  • 2012
    2.42
  • 2013
    2.13
  • 2014
    2.22
  • 2015
    2.04
    • 0
    • 0.6
    • 1.2
    • 1.8
    • 2.4
    • 3

Power consumption

MWh
  • 2005
    406000
  • 2006
    418000
  • 2007
    427000
  • 2008
    414000
  • 2009
    384000
  • 2010
    422000
  • 2011
    442000
  • 2012
    444519
  • 2013
    447910
  • 2014
    460350
  • 2015
    470940
    • 0k
    • 150k
    • 300k
    • 450k
    • 600k
    • 750k

Power consumption per ton of product

Power consumption per ton of product
  • 2005
    99.6
  • 2006
    101.2
  • 2007
    104.8
  • 2008
    103.5
  • 2009
    91.4
  • 2010
    93.0
  • 2011
    96.2
  • 2012
    92.3
  • 2013
    88.4
  • 2014
    88.3
  • 2015
    83.4
    • 0
    • 25
    • 50
    • 75
    • 100
    • 125

RDF - Using wastes as alternative fuel

65NIS M

invested in setting up a system for receiving and ordering Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF)

In 2014 Nesher completed a large-scale NIS 65 million project that includes a new refuse-derived fuel (RDF) input/output system in the Ramla plant. Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF), is processed fuel that is generated from industrial and urban waste with a high energetic value. In order to produce it, materials such as paper, cardboard, plastics, plastic bags, trimmed branches, textiles etc. are removed and shredded so that they can then be used as a fuel for various installations. The use of RDF is very common and it serves as a feed material for many cement plants worldwide.

The use of RDF yields several environmental benefits: reduction of the amounts of waste sent to landfills (as well as reduction of air pollutant emissions resulting from transportation of waste to landfills located in the south of Israel) as well as reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

untitled-2

The use of waste as a source of energy in cement kilns does not increase air pollutant emissions, due to the prolonged residence time in the kiln, the high temperature and the direct contact between the flame and the raw material (which absorb inorganic elements in RDF.)

In 2015, Nesher received approximately 18,063 tons of RDF.As of 2016, Nesher expects to receive approximately 150K tons of RDF per year.

music

About the project

891112

Water Consumption

Currently, Nesher consumes water mainly for the purpose of cooling its facilities. Water is also used for wetting unpaved roads and piles of raw materials, in order to prevent emission of dust into the air. Where possible, Nesher uses wastewater as an alternative to freshwater.

In 2015, Nesher used about 5716 cubic meters of marginal water, including saltwater from the power station, as an alternative for using freshwater for the purpose of dust reduction and for cooling. At the Ramla and Haifa Nesher plants, water is used to cool the air in cooling towers, cool the cement in the cement mills, wet roads in order to prevent dust, and for sanitary purposes.

The old methods of cement production, using wet kilns consumed large amounts of water. The transition in 1999 to cement production using the dry process, in which no water is used, resulted in a dramatic reduction in water consumption.

Actions are being taken at all Nesher plants to reduce water consumption in general and freshwater consumption in particular.

Freshwater consumption

Cubic Meters

 201320142015
Nesher
841,000878,859326,172

untitled-5

Marginal water (non-freshwater) consumption

Cubic Meters

 201320142015
Nesher
25,70028,30521,716

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Wastewater

 

At Nesher's production sites, most of the water is used for cooling, wetting roads, and sanitary purposes. Consequently, most of the wastewater produced is not industrial wastewater but sanitary sewage. This sewage is transferred for processing in the municipal sewage treatment system.
In 2015, Nesher transferred about 40K cubic meters of wastewater to wastewater management facilities.

Waste Management

Waste management at Nesher in 2015

  • Waste for recycling
  • Waste for landfilling
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